Clyde Bridge, between Hamilton and Motherwell, under construction in 1928.
Clyde Bridge, between Hamilton and Motherwell, under construction in 1928.

This project comprised a study of the surviving shipwreck heritage of Clyde-built vessels lost within the Clyde estuary and Firth of Clyde.

The project collated information from a range of sources and has enhanced knowledge of Clyde-built wrecks within the Clyde. In particular, information from recreational divers has proved invaluable and has been the source of detailed information about the current condition of many Clyde-built wrecks – useful for on-going management.

A number of wrecks previously recorded as of unknown identity in the National Record of the Historic Environment database were positively identified during the project, and more accurate positional information was established for a number of other wrecks. Additionally, the project identified a potentially significant wreck (Margaret Niven) the remains of which were not previously recorded.

This project also identified a number of other potentially significant wrecks within the Clyde, which reflect both its unique contributions to world-wide shipbuilding and local connections. These wrecks include paddle steamers (Lapwing and Princess of Wales), Clyde Puffers (e.g. Margaret Niven), steam-yachts with military connections (HMS Breda), a dredger (Greenock) and an 18th-century West Indiaman (Lady Margaret). Numerous other wrecks have been identified by this project, all significant in a variety of ways.